New Interview Details Game Play & MoreNew Interview Details Game Play & More

 

Folks interested in learning more about Spirit Tales will want to head over to the official forums to check out a user interview with an “as yet unnamed Spirit Tales developer”. The interview wanders all over the game and details some of its interesting aspects including pet morphing and boss battles.

What can the players expect in the Closed Beta?

In Closed Beta, we’ll be opening all content up to level 40 to our users, absolutely free! This includes 5 instances, hundreds of quests, a bazillion pets, PvP Battle Zones, and more! Not to mention special closed beta rewards, custom titles, and achievements only available to testers during Closed Beta! Oh and of course events! We’ve got events that range from holiday celebrations, GM beat-downs, hide- and-go-seek, screenshot and video contests, and everything in between. It’s your chance to win awesome prizes that carry over to Open Beta.

 

the inquisition of authoritiesthe inquisition of authorities

the updated skills we’ve seen make the Barbarian much more dynamic – not merely a piece of meat, but a piece of finely trained, combat-honed meat – the filet mignon of fighting. The new Leap conveys impact and damage in a way the old attack utterly failed to do, and the updated, gory Whirlwind makes the Tasmanian Devil look like, well, a cartoon character.

What we know: The only other playable class shown so far is the Witch Doctor, new for Diablo III. Hailing from the Tribe of the Five Hills in the Tegonze jungles, his specialties are disease attacks, mind control, and commanding other creatures to do his bidding. The voracious Locust Swarm not only skins enemy monsters down to the bone, but once the bugs have made their first kill, they seek out new targets automatically. Those swarms can ride shotgun with summoned Mongrels, giving the dog-like creatures an extra kick of disease damage when they strike

When it’s time for defense, the Witch Doctor can summon a Wall of Zombies, effectively sealing off a pathway and letting the undead tear any approaching enemies to shreds. Soul Harvest does what it says, sucking the life essence out of enemies within range and transferring it to you. And when it comes to messing with people’s minds, Horrify and Mass Confusion offer mental anguish in two flavors: the former disperses packs of enemies in fear, giving you time to summon pets and pick off a few stragglers, while the latter turns the mob members against each other. Despite a penchant for violence by proxy 

philosopher’s stonephilosopher’s stone

The Barbarian was Diablo II’s ultimate melee badass, and the only class that could dual-wield. He’s back with a beefy update, but many of his old attacks have been seriously enhanced. The Leap was more like a hop in Diablo II; now, it’s truly a vault, as the Barbarian bounds about six feet into the air, both arms cocked behind his head, then lands with a thunderous shockwave and the crimson explosion of any nearby monsters.

 The Ground Stomp stuns enemies in the immediate vicinity, leaving them open to Cleave attacks that send corpses and body parts flying for several dozen feet. The Seismic Slam combines both those skills into a directional attack; smack the ground and a shockwave ripples the earth, liquefying anything in its path. And the fan-favorite Whirlwind – the best way to plow through hordes of encroaching monsters – is gorier than ever: the Barbarian spins as he moves, slicing enemies into bloody chunks.

 

 There was no better class for tanking in Diablo II, so the Barbarian’s inclusion in Diablo III is really no surprise – what would a dungeon crawler be without a bruiser bashing open the doors? 

Malleus MaleficarumMalleus Maleficarum

for instance, can slam a wall in the Forgotten Tombs to make it collapse on and eliminate a crowd of walking dead. When he lunges into a wall, rubble falls away from the edges. Bits of concept art suggests a city desert environment with cave-like apartments, an Arabian palace dungeon reminiscent of Diablo II’s Lut Gholein, and the dilapidated town of New Tristram, which isn’t nearly as shiny as its name suggests.

What we think: We like wrecking stuff, so here’s hoping that the environmental destruction won’t be too cookie-cutter. It’s fun to see worlds collapse, but it becomes invisible if it always collapses the same way. We’re also curious to see how this feature plays out in outdoor environments – we’ve seen man-made structures fall apart in the early footage of the game, but no trees were toppled and grass remained curiously flameproof in fiery battles.

just last summarization:the possession of man-made  architecture make the enviroment more brilliant,spectaculr,magnificent,and more significantly ,they are preoccupation with  the exirpation of supreme monster 

The Environment

 Don’t let nostalgia upscale the screenshots in your mind: Diablo II’s maximum resolution was a paltry 800×600. Diablo III’s overhead isometric view keeps the game’s look consistent with the series; the camera stays clear of the action and we’ve seen no gimmicky use of 3D so far. We really don’t see a downside to this one – it’s logical progress.

What we know: Destructible environments are the order of the day, and they go hand in hand with the 3D engine. Some of it’s eye candy, like furniture that splinters after bearing the brunt of a magical attack, doors that can be blown off their hinges, and ancient bookshelves that spill dusty tomes (and their individual pages) onto the floor as they collapse. But some of it’s tactical, too: the Barbarian, for instance, can slam a wall in the Forgotten Tombs to make it collapse on and eliminate a crowd of walking dead.

 When he lunges into a wall, rubble falls away from the edges. Bits of concept art suggests a city desert environment with cave-like apartments, an Arabian palace dungeon reminiscent of Diablo II’s Lut Gholein, and the dilapidated town of New Tristram, which isn’t nearly as shiny as its name suggests 

The GraphicsThe Graphics

 

After a decade of desperation, the prayers and ritual sacrifices of Diablo fans have been answered with the announcement of Diablo III. But with an eye to the past, not everybody’s happy about Diablo’s future. Here’s what we know – and what we think – about Blizzard’s next (best?) thing.

What we know: Diablo III is powered by a proprietary new 3D engine (with no catchy name as of yet), and the first screens and game footage offer a taste of what it’s been built to do. The world’s depth is immediately apparent: for instance, instead of simply spawning offscreen, ghouls scramble up the walls from the unseen depths of the Forgotten Tombs, only to fall off bridges back into the mist when they’re killed.

And yet, even though the objects are built in a 3D space, many of the elements look painted, particularly in the autumnal Leoric Highlands. Ankle-deep water, hazy rain, fog, smoke, and swaying grass are all benefits of the modern tech beneath the gameplay – not to mention the splattery hunks of meat and gore that come from dispatched enemies. Diablo III will support both DirectX 9 and 10, so if you haven’t upgraded your rig in a year or two, you’re not completely sunk.

What we think: Diablo in 3D? It’s not heresy – it’s about time! Or rather, it’s about every game being a product of its time. Diablo II made excellent use of 2D graphics, but that’s because it came out eight years ago 

you’ve progressed on the path to fame and gloryyou’ve progressed on the path to fame and glory

 

You’ll learn many of the fundamentals of PvP (like how to avoid attacks or target specific foes) by playing the single-player game, but PvP differs in that it isn’t an ideal venue for gathering new weapons and armor. Your rewards for shedding blood in the arena are purer than that: bragging rights, the joy of sending friends old and new to their swift and inglorious deaths, and points that represent how far you’ve progressed on the path to fame and glory.

When you participate in ranked games (fights that pit two opposing teams of players against each other in ‘best of’ matches), you’ll earn points for advancement based on kills, accomplished objectives, wins, and other factors.

Points lead to multiplayer achievements, titles, and more. Our system is focused on encouraging furious combat and multiplayer progression, not stringent competitive rankings, so you’ll earn points after every match and Battle.net matchmaking will pit you against similarly skilled opponents. 

Your rewards for sheddingYour rewards for shedding

 

When you participate in ranked games (fights that pit two opposing teams of players against each other in ‘best of’ matches), you’ll earn points for advancement based on kills, accomplished objectives, wins, and other factors. Points lead to multiplayer achievements, titles, and more. Our system is focused on encouraging furious combat and multiplayer progression, not stringent competitive rankings, so you’ll earn points after every match and Battle.net matchmaking will pit you against similarly skilled opponents.

We’re also looking into other PvP game types that exist outside the ranking system, like 1-on-1 duels and mutually chosen team battles (for example, you and your friends could divide into two teams for an arena showdown). We’ll have more information on the availability of these game types in the future. 

Is that what they’re thinking too?Is that what they’re thinking too?

 

PvP (short for ‘player versus player’ combat) has had a storied history in the Diablo series. For Diablo III, we’ve decided to take it in a new direction to ensure that it’s deep, organized, frantic, and fun.

Diablo III’s PvP battles are fought in arenas spread out across the world of Sanctuary. These arenas aren’t random — they’re all unique, designed with differing amounts of terrain and cover. You participate in PvP using the character of your choice, with access to all of the gear and skills you’ve accumulated playing the game in single-player or cooperative mode.

You’ll learn many of the fundamentals of PvP (like how to avoid attacks or target specific foes) by playing the single-player game, but PvP differs in that it isn’t an ideal venue for gathering new weapons and armor. Your rewards for shedding blood in the arena are purer than that: bragging rights, the joy of sending friends old and new to their swift and inglorious deaths, and points that represent how far you’ve progressed on the path to fame and glory. 

new monsters in subsequent acts, eventsnew monsters in subsequent acts, events

 

Part of making monster encounters more interesting rests on the shoulders of the monsters themselves — but it’s just as important that we prepare you, and our heroes, for exciting combat. Every class in Diablo III is a ‘DPS’ class, and damage output is vitally important, but no matter your build, you can customize your defensive skills as much as your offensive ones.

 Each hero has a significant arsenal of defensive skills — Frost Novas, Mirror Images, stunning Ground Stomps, blinding Assaults, Lethal Decoys that taunt foes away — and, without a limitless supply of healing potions, it’s critical that you use them carefully to stay alive.

As you encounter new monsters in subsequent acts, events, and quests, you’ll need to keep your combat strategy fluid.. When distinct, diverse monsters coordinate their attacks, you can’t repeatedly use the same ability to achieve a hollow victory. Just as importantly, it means that you’ll experience engaging, frenetic battles — the kind that challenge your mind as much as your reflexes